comprehensive8psychosis
Because women of colour experience racism in ways not always the same as those experienced by men of color and sexism in ways not always parallel to experiences of white women, antiracism and feminism are limited, even on their own terms… The failure of feminism to interrogate race means that the resistance strategies of feminism will often replicate and reinforce the subordination of people of colour, and the failure of antiracism to interrogate patriarchy means that antiracism will frequently reproduce the subordination of women
Kimberle Crenshaw in Mapping the Margins: Intersectionality, Identity Politics, and Violence Against Women of Color (via decolonizeyourmind)
kyssthis16
oreocookieelitist:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

TRANSGRIOT: Black Transwoman Monica Jones convicted of “manifesting intent to prostitution” in Arizona

Have another reason to not like Arizona despite some of the cool people who call it home. Been keeping an eye on the ongoing case of ASU student Monica Jones, who was accosted on the street while walking in her Phoenix neighborhood during a sting operation and charged with ‘manifestation of intent to prostitute’ the very night after she spoke at a May 2013 rally denouncing Project ROSE.  .Project ROSE is a program created with 15 partner organizations including the Phoenix Police Department with the goal of avoiding filing charges against adults engaged in prostitution, providing an opportunity for medical and social services and assistance in helping them exit the life of prostitution if they choose.   In practice, the program and its profiled prostitution sweeps target trans, SGL and low income women far too often and has a 30% success rate, the same rate as a woman who goes before a judge and hasn’t gone through the unjust Catholic Charities supported program.   
Jones believes she was unfairly targeted for arrest because of her outspoken criticism of Project ROSE.   A Change.org petitionwas created urging the Phoenix city prosecutor to drop the charges against her..     

And they trying to throw her into a goddamn mens prison. FUCK the judge FUCK the poilice, FUCK the catholic charities, FUCK Project ROSE and ALLLLLL its partners. She is appealing. Keep her in your thoughts.

Read about Project ROSE not too long ago. This is some fucked up shit.

oreocookieelitist:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

TRANSGRIOT: Black Transwoman Monica Jones convicted of “manifesting intent to prostitution” in Arizona

Have another reason to not like Arizona despite some of the cool people who call it home. 

Been keeping an eye on the ongoing case of ASU student Monica Jones, who was accosted on the street while walking in her Phoenix neighborhood during a sting operation and charged with ‘manifestation of intent to prostitute’ the very night after she spoke at a May 2013 rally denouncing Project ROSE.  .

Project ROSE is a program created with 15 partner organizations including the Phoenix Police Department with the goal of avoiding filing charges against adults engaged in prostitution, providing an opportunity for medical and social services and assistance in helping them exit the life of prostitution if they choose.   

In practice, the program and its profiled prostitution sweeps target trans, SGL and low income women far too often and has a 30% success rate, the same rate as a woman who goes before a judge and hasn’t gone through the unjust Catholic Charities supported program.   


Jones believes she was unfairly targeted for arrest because of her outspoken criticism of Project ROSE.   A Change.org petitionwas created urging the Phoenix city prosecutor to drop the charges against her..     

And they trying to throw her into a goddamn mens prison. FUCK the judge FUCK the poilice, FUCK the catholic charities, FUCK Project ROSE and ALLLLLL its partners. She is appealing. Keep her in your thoughts.

Read about Project ROSE not too long ago. This is some fucked up shit.

knowledgeequalsblackpower

fuckyeahifightlikeagirl:

samflow:

The SCAR Project: Breast Cancer Is Not A Pink Ribbon

The SCAR Project is a series of large-scale portraits of young breast cancer survivors shot by fashion photographer David Jay. Primarily an awareness raising campaign, The SCAR Project puts a raw, unflinching face on early onset breast cancer while paying tribute to the courage and spirit of so many brave young women.

Dedicated to the more than 10,000 women under the age of 40 who will be diagnosed this year alone, The SCAR Project is an exercise in awareness, hope, reflection and healing.

Read more here

Now HERE’S a good goddamn glimpse at breast cancer.  Fuck your “save second base” bullshit.  -C

ethiopienne

wocinsolidarity:

19 Asian Actresses on Major U.S. Cable Network Shows

Arden Cho (Korean) as Kira Yukimura on Teen Wolf 

Aubrey Anderson-Emmons (Korean) as Lily Tucker-Pritchett on Modern Family

Archie Panjabi (Sindhi) as Kalinda Sharma on The Good Wife

Chloe Bennet (Chinese and Jewish) as Skye on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Grace Park (Korean) as Kono Kalakaua on Hawaii Five-0

Hannah Simone (Indian and German/Italian/Greek) as Cece Parekh on New Girl

Jamie Chung (Korean) as Mulan on Once Upon a Time

Jenna Ushkowitz (Korean) as Tina Cohen-Chang on Glee

Jessica Lu (Chinese and Japanese) as Ming Huang on Awkward.

Maggie Q (Vietnamese and Irish/Polish) as Nikita on Nikita

Michaela Conlin (Chinese and Irish) as Angela Montenegro on Bones

Mindy Kaling (Tamil and Bengali) as Mindy Lahiri on The Mindy Project

Ming-Na Wen (Chinese) as Melinda May on Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.

Parminder Nagra (Indian) as Meera Malik on The Blacklist

Reshma Shetty (Indian) as Divya Katdare on Royal Pains

Sandra Oh (Korean) as Cristina Yang on Grey’s Anatomy

Shay Mitchell (Filipina and Scottish/Irish) as Emily Fields on Pretty Little Liars

Tania Gunadi (Indonesian) as Private Park on Enlisted

Yunjin Kim (Korean) as Karen Kim on Mistresses 

This was made in response to an anon we recently got who asked,

(Image reads - anonymous asked wocinsolidarity: We all know Lucy Liu is an industry favorite but do you know of any other Eastern Asia (or Asia in general) woc actresses?)

So rather then do a laundry list, I thought it would be cool to compile a photoset of someof the Asian actresses currently on television shows that aren’t Lucy Liu (though we do love us some Joan Watson). I asked around, and made this list based on my own TV watching and suggestions from people I know. So A) I don’t actually know if all of these shows are good or not and B) if one of your faves is missing it wasn’t done maliciously. 

*Disclaimers: All images used were found on Google. We do not own or claim to own any of these photos. All information about ethnic identity was found from Wikipedia, so let us know if anything is incorrect! 

Also: Sorry for how bad the quality of the photoset is. 

Edit: also I’m so sorry I clearly can’t count, this is only 19! 

omoyoruba
Whenever I hear the "Women are paid $.78 for the man’s $1" I flip it around.

Men make $1.22 for every woman’s $1.

It interests me that even the most common simple measure of gender inequality is firmly based on male-as-normative …

bisexual activist and queer theory blogger Patrick RichardsFink 

this is an interesting point, although mathematically inaccurate: assuming the women:men, 0.78:1 ratio is correct, men make $1.28 for every woman’s $1

A white man makes $1.34 for every dollar that a black man makes

A white man makes $1.52 for every dollar that a latino man makes

A white man makes $1.24 for every dollar that a white woman makes

A white man makes $1.44 for every dollar that a black woman makes

A white man makes $1.67 for every dollar that a latina woman makes

That’s some bullshit right there.

Let’s take it a step further. For every hour a white man works, a black woman has to work 86 minutes to earn as much money. 57.6 hours a week compared to the white man’s 40.

Take it another step further. Assuming a Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 job, from Thursday 12:45pm through Friday end of business, a white man gets paid for his work, a black woman is, by comparison, working for free.

(via quentintortellini)

THE LAST LINE

(via covenesque)

kenobi-wan-obi

kenobi-wan-obi:

jugodechinola:

De la mata a la taza -The process in which cocoa farmers in the Dominican Republic process the bean into “chocolate” is really interesting. Keep in mind, the chocolate consumed in the United States is much different than what cocoa farmers in the island produce, largely in part because highly refined chocolate requires lots of power, shitty chemicals, and nearly ubiquitous air conditioning and refrigeration. Most of the chocolate made in the DR is consumed as a beverage, not eaten [in my opinion, it tastes much much better]. The cocoa beans may or may not be fermented before drying, roasting, and then grinding. Sugar—and optionally vanilla, cinnamon, and/or pepper—can be added to the coarsely ground cocoa mass, then molded into balls or other shapes, before cooling and hardening. As needed, the resulting “chocolate” is grated into water or milk.

[Photo credit: El Nacional]

I wonder how much alternate processing methods are used in D.R. foods cause I’m always catching myself loving the taste of everything a lot more over there than here. Like here you can’t taste the fake.

pubhealth
unicef:

Meet Moossa, a 6 months old boy from Baghdad – and sadly, Iraq’s first victim of polio in 14 years.
“I never thought that my child could be paralyzed,” says his father, who deeply regrets not having his children vaccinated against this debilitating disease.
Since the detection of Moossa’s case, polio vaccination campaigns have begun in Iraq, Syria and Egypt to reach all children under 5. Read more in our latest blog post: http://uni.cf/1kJIAAk  

unicef:

Meet Moossa, a 6 months old boy from Baghdad – and sadly, Iraq’s first victim of polio in 14 years.

“I never thought that my child could be paralyzed,” says his father, who deeply regrets not having his children vaccinated against this debilitating disease.

Since the detection of Moossa’s case, polio vaccination campaigns have begun in Iraq, Syria and Egypt to reach all children under 5. Read more in our latest blog post: http://uni.cf/1kJIAAk  

navigatethestream
fuckyeahchicanawriters:


Hello Community Family.
I am the Executive Director of Families for Justice as Healing (www.justiceashealing.org). We are a criminal justice reform, legislative advocacy organization and we advocate for community wellness alternatives to incarceration. We focus on women. We draft model state and federal legislation with a focus on reducing the number of incarcerated women. There has been a dramatic increase in incarceration of women in the United States in ten years. 70% of incarcerated women were the primary caregivers of their children prior to their incarceration and  the period of incarceration of mothers and separation from their children creates serious collateral consequences for children and the entire community. 

We are organizing the FREE HER Rally on June 21, 2014 in Washington DC on the Washington Mall. Women and supporters from across the country coming together to raise our voices as one to end mass incarceration and the war on drugs, the major catalyst to mass incarceration of women. We are asking President Obama to commute the sentences of women in the federal system serving non-violent drug sentences.

Our event kicks off with a nation wide call-in day on June 20th in support of the Smarter Sentencing Act. …And then we are showing up on June 21st, on the Washington Mall, 10,000 women, men and children strong. We are asking individuals and organizations to join us. Help us raise our voices to end unjust and disparate sentencing laws and help mothers, grandmothers, sisters, aunts and wives return to their families and begin to heal themselves, the children and our communities. Please share this and join us on June 21, 2014. FREE HER! - Thank you. - Andrea James

 

fuckyeahchicanawriters:

Hello Community Family.
I am the Executive Director of Families for Justice as Healing (www.justiceashealing.org). We are a criminal justice reform, legislative advocacy organization and we advocate for community wellness alternatives to incarceration. We focus on women. We draft model state and federal legislation with a focus on reducing the number of incarcerated women. There has been a dramatic increase in incarceration of women in the United States in ten years. 70% of incarcerated women were the primary caregivers of their children prior to their incarceration and  the period of incarceration of mothers and separation from their children creates serious collateral consequences for children and the entire community. 

We are organizing the FREE HER Rally on June 21, 2014 in Washington DC on the Washington Mall. Women and supporters from across the country coming together to raise our voices as one to end mass incarceration and the war on drugs, the major catalyst to mass incarceration of women. We are asking President Obama to commute the sentences of women in the federal system serving non-violent drug sentences.

Our event kicks off with a nation wide call-in day on June 20th in support of the Smarter Sentencing Act. …And then we are showing up on June 21st, on the Washington Mall, 10,000 women, men and children strong. We are asking individuals and organizations to join us. Help us raise our voices to end unjust and disparate sentencing laws and help mothers, grandmothers, sisters, aunts and wives return to their families and begin to heal themselves, the children and our communities. Please share this and join us on June 21, 2014. FREE HER! - Thank you. - Andrea James
 
angrywocunited

policymic:

Afghan women defy the Taliban and vote

"The people out there are scared as hell of the Taliban," a U.S. Army officer who recently returned from Afghanistan told the Daily Beast. And given the 39 suicide bombings, countless threats of death and mutilation and the murder of an Afghan provincial council candidate just before the elections, they have legitimate reason to be so. 

However, the imminent danger from the Taliban did not stop the people of Afghanistan from heading to polling stations on Saturday to elect President Hamid Karzai’s successor. It’s the country’s third presidential election since the U.S. led invasion in 2001, and its first time transferring power from one elected leader to another.

Read more | Follow policymic

arelis
laborreguitina:

anarcho-queer:

Mississippi Judge Takes Baby Away From Mother, Says Lack Of English Would Cause ‘Developmental’ Problems
A federal judge has ruled that a case against two employees of Singing River Hospital and a state child welfare caseworker accused of unjustly separating a newborn baby from her mother may proceed – denying the defendants’ attempt to claim immunity for their actions
The lawsuit was filed on behalf of Baltazar Cruz and her daughter. The mother – who speaks the indigenous Mexican language Chatino, limited Spanish and virtually no English – gave birth to her daughter at Singing River Hospital in November 2008. Two days later, the child was taken from her following allegations by a hospital employee who spoke only in Spanish to the mother.
They claimed she was undocumented, traded sex for housing and concluded she intended to give her child away. While she was at the hospital, her Chatino-speaking cousin tried to tell officials that she is actually employed at a Chinese restaurant, and did not in fact “admit” to allegations that she was involved in the sex trade. But a social services representatives who did not know her language nonetheless excluded her cousin from discussions between them.
After the state health department filed a “report of suspected abuse and neglect,” officials temporarily gave Baltazar Cruz’s baby to a couple who wanted to adopt a child, but were not licensed as foster parents, according to court documents. And at a court hearing that followed, Judge Sharon Sigalas agreed with the couple’s argument that the baby would have “developmental” problems because she would not communicate with the baby in English.
Baltazar Cruz was without her daughter for almost a year, and the court nearly terminated her parental rights.
It was only after a federal investigation of the case was initiated that the judge, prosecutor, and guardian ad litem all recused themselves from the case, claiming a new conflict of interest. The judge who replaced Sigalas granted Baltazar Cruz custody.
A federal judge ruled Friday that these officials could not now claim immunity from constitutional allegations against them, concluding, “This case is riddled with contradicting stories and potential indicia of misconduct.”

this is fucked up in one too many ways.

laborreguitina:

anarcho-queer:

Mississippi Judge Takes Baby Away From Mother, Says Lack Of English Would Cause ‘Developmental’ Problems

A federal judge has ruled that a case against two employees of Singing River Hospital and a state child welfare caseworker accused of unjustly separating a newborn baby from her mother may proceed – denying the defendants’ attempt to claim immunity for their actions

The lawsuit was filed on behalf of Baltazar Cruz and her daughter. The mother – who speaks the indigenous Mexican language Chatino, limited Spanish and virtually no English – gave birth to her daughter at Singing River Hospital in November 2008. Two days later, the child was taken from her following allegations by a hospital employee who spoke only in Spanish to the mother.

They claimed she was undocumented, traded sex for housing and concluded she intended to give her child away. While she was at the hospital, her Chatino-speaking cousin tried to tell officials that she is actually employed at a Chinese restaurant, and did not in fact “admit” to allegations that she was involved in the sex trade. But a social services representatives who did not know her language nonetheless excluded her cousin from discussions between them.

After the state health department filed a “report of suspected abuse and neglect,” officials temporarily gave Baltazar Cruz’s baby to a couple who wanted to adopt a child, but were not licensed as foster parents, according to court documents. And at a court hearing that followed, Judge Sharon Sigalas agreed with the couple’s argument that the baby would have “developmental” problems because she would not communicate with the baby in English.

Baltazar Cruz was without her daughter for almost a year, and the court nearly terminated her parental rights.

It was only after a federal investigation of the case was initiated that the judge, prosecutor, and guardian ad litem all recused themselves from the case, claiming a new conflict of interest. The judge who replaced Sigalas granted Baltazar Cruz custody.

A federal judge ruled Friday that these officials could not now claim immunity from constitutional allegations against them, concluding, “This case is riddled with contradicting stories and potential indicia of misconduct.”

this is fucked up in one too many ways.

thefemaletyrant
thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math


Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!

thebigbadafro:

nieceoftheserpent:

theskaldspeaks:

needtherapy:

jnenifre:

From Facebook

After spending years developing a simple machine to make inexpensive sanitary pads, Arunachalam Muruganantham has become the unlikely leader of a menstrual health revolution in rural India. Over sixteen years, Muruganantham’s machine has spread to 1,300 villages in 23 states and since most of his clients are NGOs and women’s self-help groups who produce and sell the pads directly in a “by the women, for the women, and to the women” model, the average machine also provides employment for ten women. 

Muruganantham’s interest in menstrual health began in 1998 when, as a young, newly married man, he saw his wife, Shanthi, hiding the rags she used as menstrual cloths. Like most men in his village, he had no idea about the reality of menstruation and was horrified that cloths that “I would not even use… to clean my scooter” were his wife’s solution to menstrual sanitation. When he asked why she didn’t buy sanitary pads, she told him that the expense would prevent her from buying staples like milk for the family. 

Muruganantham, who left school at age 14 to start working, decided to try making his own sanitary pads for less but the testing of his first prototype ran into a snag almost immediately: Muruganantham had no idea that periods were monthly. “I can’t wait a month for each feedback, it’ll take two decades!” he said, and sought volunteers among the women in his community. He discovered that less than 10% of the women in his area used sanitary pads, instead using rags, sawdust, leaves, or ash. Even if they did use cloths, they were too embarrassed to dry them in the sun, meaning that they never got disinfected — contributing to the approximately 70% of all reproductive diseases in India that are caused by poor menstrual hygiene. 

Finding volunteers was nearly impossible: women were embarrassed, or afraid of myths about sanitary pads that say that women who use them will go blind or never marry. Muruganantham came up with an ingenious solution: “I became the man who wore a sanitary pad,” he says. He made an artificial uterus, filled it with goat’s blood, and wore it throughout the day. But his determination had severe consequences: his village concluded he was a pervert with a sexual disease, his mother left his household in shame and his wife left him. As he remarks in the documentary “Menstrual Man” about his experience, “So you see God’s sense of humour. I’d started the research for my wife and after 18 months she left me!”

After years of research, Muruganantham perfected his machine and now works with NGOs and women’s self-help groups to distribute it. Women can use it to make sanitary napkins for themselves, but he encourages them to make pads to sell as well to provide employment for women in poor communities. And, since 23% of girls drop out of school once they start menstruating, he also works with schools, teaching girls to make their own pads: “Why wait till they are women? Why not empower girls?” 

As communities accepted his machine, opinions of his “crazy” behavior changed. Five and a half years after she left, Shanthi contacted him, and they are now living together again. She says it was hard living with the ostracization that came from his project, but now, she helps spread the word about sanitary napkins to other women. “Initially I used to be very shy when talking to people about it, but after all this time, people have started to open up. Now they come and talk to me, they ask questions and they also get sanitary napkins to try them.”

In 2009, Muruganantham was honored with a national Innovation Award in 2009 by then President of India, Pratibha Patil, beating out nearly 1,000 other entries. Now, he’s looking at expanding to other countries and believes that 106 countries could benefit from his invention. 

Muruganantham is proud to have made such a difference: “from childhood I know no human being died because of poverty — everything happens because of ignorance… I have accumulated no money but I accumulate a lot of happiness.” His proudest moment? A year after he installed one of the machines in a village so poor that, for generations, no one had earned enough for their children to attend school. Then he received a call from one of the women selling sanitary pads who told him that, thanks to the income, her daughter was now able to go to school. 

To read more about Muruganantham’s story, the BBC featured a recent profile on him at http://bbc.in/1i8tebG or watch his TED talk at http://bit.ly/1n594l6. You can also view his company’s website at http://newinventions.in/

To learn more about the 2013 documentary Menstrual Man about Muruganantham, visit http://www.menstrualman.com/

For resources to help girls prepare for and understand their periods - including several first period kits - visit our post on: “That Time of the Month: Teaching Your Mighty Girl about Her Menstrual Cycle” at www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=3281

To help your tween understand the changes she’s experiencing both physically and emotionally during puberty, check out the books recommended in our post on “Talking with Tweens and Teens About Their Bodies” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=2229

And, if you’re looking for ways to encourage your children to become the next engineering and technology innovators, visit A Mighty Girl’s STEM toy section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/toys/toys-games/science-math

Awesome, dude. Awesome. I mean, AWESOME.

WHAT AN EPIC BADASS!

This man is awesome!

I hope that’s his wife putting pads together in the back. His swag is on 5hunna just because he’s part of the gotdamn solution!