tyece
dallastar:

ncolecola:

foreverpruned:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.
Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.
Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.
So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.
As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information, including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence. 

YAAASSS Bitch read ha!!! Let ha know!!! 

Not only is the information great but the comment boss! BLACK EXCELLENCE

The comment? #science

dallastar:

ncolecola:

foreverpruned:

yungmethuselah:

ikazed:

youngblackandvegan:

black excellence

No, human excellence.

Let’s talk about set theory! In mathematical logic, we have a subfield called “set theory” where we study how items are collected into groups.

Providing a sort of logical bedrock, set theory informs foundational mathematics and computer science, among other fields, and continues to be a topic of mathematical research.

Sound too esoteric? Okay, you’re familiar with Venn diagrams, right? Venn diagrams are an example of basic set theory.

image

And you know how all squares are rectangles, but not all rectangles are squares? There we go, more set theory.

So, Black people are group within the larger group humans, i.e. all Black people are humans, BUT not all humans are Black people.

As you can see in the photograph above, Keven Stonewall, the Chicago teen who may cure colon cancer, is Black. Keven Stonewall’s membership in other groups such as humans, Chicagoans and teenagers occurs simultaneously; consider “Chicago teen.”

Why do we say “square” when we could say “rectangle”? Because “square” conveys useful information,
including “rectangle”—as well as a refinement.

When we say Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence, we mean Keven Stonewall is an example of Black excellence.

YAAASSS Bitch read ha!!! Let ha know!!!

Not only is the information great but the comment boss! BLACK EXCELLENCE

The comment? #science

thefemaletyrant

thefemaletyrant:

"Do you want the baby with or without the placenta?" The woman who calls herself “Mama” looks at us and clairifies whether we want a “fresh” baby. 

We meet her in the dark and simple office of her half-burned baby factory.  She thinks we want to buy a baby, but in fact we are carrying a hidden camera. 

Every year, the Nigerian police discover several new baby factories. Women are held captive to give birth to babies destined to be sold illegally either to adoptive parents, rituals, or slavery.  Large parts of the trade are conducted locally in Nigeria, but the police suspect that children also have been sold to Europe and the USA.

Nevertheless, many countries continue to adopt children from Nigeria. Since 2008, at least 78 Nigerian adoptions have occurred in Sweden, according to statistics from Adoptionscentrum. These children have special needs and are most probably not from the baby factories, but the phenomenon is well known. International adoption agencies claim that the children, their parents and the entire adoption process is overseen by the Nigerian government. But in Nigeria there are no such guaranties.

Today, in an exclusive story, Expressen reveals how the baby-trafficking from Nigeria works.

With a hidden camera, we have infiltrated several of the baby factories in southern Nigeria. To get access to the factories, we claimed to be interested in buying a child and that we wanted to meet the pregnant women in order to choose the mother of our baby, and also that we were from an organization called Home of Hope that wanted to have future business relations with the baby factories.

It takes us just three days to establish contact with several agents that are part of the baby trafficking networks. They claim to be able to get us babies by the following day. One of the agents mentions that an infant, due to be born in a couple of days, is meant to go to a couple in Spain but could be ours since we are on location.

“They won’t notice if they get another baby,” says Frank, the agent that we meet in the city of Umuahia.

“Do you want a girl or a boy? Twins perhaps?”

We say that we want to go to the factories, see the women, and then decide if we want to go through with the deal.

“Oh, that is hard. There has been a lot of trouble with the police and the women are hidden. But we give them food, shelter and sleep with them so they keep calm. I’m a father to many of the sold children, haha. But I’m going to try to solve this.”

The next day we meet up with another agent in the city of Aba. She knows of many baby factories and immediately gives us the addresses.

The first baby factory we visit is situated in a small village, an hour outside of Aba. It’s hot and we’re nervous. We are on our way to meet people who are willing to sell children for money, in other words hardened criminals. We are worried that they are going to discover the hidden camera or not believe our cover-story about Home of Hope. We have already decided it is worth the risk. The tall gate is locked when we arrive. We park the car close to the wall to ensure an escape route if we are caught. Finally a guard opens the gate. Almost all buildings are burnt to the ground and two Volvos have been scrapped in the yard. Over the car doors small children’s shirts are hung to dry. Behind one of the burnt down walls we can spot a couple of mattresses and a fire with a pot hanging over it. A couple of minutes later we see the first pregnant woman. After a short period of time we have counted five pregnant women pacing back and forth.

An older woman enters through the gate. She introduces herself as “Mama” and asks us to follow her to the office. We explain our business. She lights up when we start talking business and dollars.

“I have five women here but 35 in another house in Umuahia. You can go there and see. But we have to talk to my son ‘cause we run this together,” she says.

She tells us that she charges 4000 dollar for a girl and 4400 dollar for a boy.

“I give the girls food and shelter and help them with their physical exams. The same day they give birth they go away, she says.”

She claims to be able to get children of all ages and genders and at any time. She can also arrange court orders and deal with the police.

“I delivered three babies yesterday and they have already been picked up by Nigerians.”

A hidden camera investigation into the world of baby factories in South-Eastern Nigeria.

I’m so saddened and ashamed!!!!

becauseiamawoman
micdotcom:

‘Rosie the Riveter’ camps are real and we wish we could go to one 

Summer camp has never looked so good, or so empowering.
Rosie’s Girls is taking a newer, feminist spin on the idea of what it means to have a summer experience with your peers. The program, which operates in several states nationwide, takes middle school-aged girls on a journey that includes both manual work and emotional work, with the goal of imparting the self-confidence sympbolized by the camp’s namesake: feminist icon Rosie the Riveter and her real-life counterparts.
It’s about so much more than metal shop | Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

‘Rosie the Riveter’ camps are real and we wish we could go to one 

Summer camp has never looked so good, or so empowering.

Rosie’s Girls is taking a newer, feminist spin on the idea of what it means to have a summer experience with your peers. The program, which operates in several states nationwide, takes middle school-aged girls on a journey that includes both manual work and emotional work, with the goal of imparting the self-confidence sympbolized by the camp’s namesake: feminist icon Rosie the Riveter and her real-life counterparts.

It’s about so much more than metal shop | Follow micdotcom

dynastylnoire
lakotapeopleslawproject:

Become a MEMBER at http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka to show your support and help us to create foster care run by Lakota, for Lakota. South Dakota has been willfully violating the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) since 2001. Because ICWA has been ignored for so long, Native American children have been unfairly persecuted. The fact that Native American children are roughly four times as likely as other ethnic groups to be placed in the foster care system, demonstrates the inequity running rampant in South Dakota. South Dakota also labels 100 percent of Native American foster children as “special needs” children, thereby drawing extra federal money for each child that is put into the system or adopted out. The state receives an extra $2000 (above the $4000 base) for each special needs child that has been adopted out, totaling $820,800 from 1998-2009. Please help us to combat these inequities for Native American children by becoming a member!

lakotapeopleslawproject:

Become a MEMBER at http://lakota.cc/1kvf8ka to show your support and help us to create foster care run by Lakota, for Lakota.

South Dakota has been willfully violating the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) since 2001. Because ICWA has been ignored for so long, Native American children have been unfairly persecuted. The fact that Native American children are roughly four times as likely as other ethnic groups to be placed in the foster care system, demonstrates the inequity running rampant in South Dakota.

South Dakota also labels 100 percent of Native American foster children as “special needs” children, thereby drawing extra federal money for each child that is put into the system or adopted out. The state receives an extra $2000 (above the $4000 base) for each special needs child that has been adopted out, totaling $820,800 from 1998-2009.

Please help us to combat these inequities for Native American children by becoming a member!

mutablefire

sktagg23:

thecuckoohaslanded:

earthlydreams:

feminismisatrick:

misanthrpologie:

Saving Face (2012), acid attacks on women in Pakistan

Meanwhile, in America, feminists are complaining about how dress codes are oppressive.

You idiots have never experienced oppression, and pray you never do, because this is what it looks like.

As a South Asian American feminist, let me remind everyone that oppression is not a competition.

Just because we fight one type of sexism doesn’t mean we don’t care about other instances of sexism that don’t affect us directly in our day to day lives.

My heart goes out to this woman and the hundreds of other victims like her. I want to educate people about these kinds of incidents. I support organizations that help women like this.

You may think that dress code issues are trivial, but they are related to a larger issue of women’s bodily autonomy, which affects women’s health and safety.

So please, let’s try to bring awareness and bring about change instead of insulting entire groups of people because they are facing issues that are less scary than the one presented.

oppression is not a competition

thank you so much for this wording

And smaller acts of oppression lead to BIGGER ONES. Oppression ESCALATES.

wocinsolidarity

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

thefoxxnextdoor

According to Stop Patriarchy, Mark Ruffalo sent a speech to be read at an abortion rights rally this weekend in Mississippi in which he expressed his frustration with the state legislature’s ongoing attempts to close every last women’s health centers that offer abortion services.
The Clarion-Ledger reports that over 100 supporters gathered at the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, and listened to a personal account of Ruffalo’s about the issue of abortion rights, in which he mentioned his mother’s struggle to obtain an abortion when she was young:

I am a man. I could say this has nothing to do with me. Except I have two daughters and I have a mother who was forced to illegally have an abortion in her state where abortion was illegal when she was a very young woman. It cost $600 cash. It was a traumatizing thing for her. It was shameful and sleazy and demeaning. When I heard the story I was aghast by the lowliness of a society that would make a woman do that. I could not understand its lack of humanity; today is no different.

Ruffalo reportedly referenced the United States as it existed pre-Roe v. Wade as “relic of an America that was not free nor equal nor very kind”, saying that it “we have worked long and hard to leave behind” that time:

My own mother fought to make herself more than a possession; she lived her life as a mother who chose when she would have children, and a wife who could earn a living if she so chose. I want my daughters to enjoy that same choice. I don’t want to turn back the hands of time to when women shuttled across state lines in the thick of night to resolve an unwanted pregnancy, in a cheap hotel room just south of the state line. Where a transaction of $600 cash becomes the worth of a young woman’s life. So that is why I am lending my voice to you and your movement today. Because I actually trust the women I know. I trust them with their choices, I trust them with their bodies and I trust them with their children.

Ruffalo has been politically active before; he’s a vocal opponent of fracking. And while his characterization of the impact of Roe v. Wade as a “law of the land for decades” is slightly historically inaccurate – anti-choice supporters have been chipping away at Roe v. Wade since that Supreme Court ruling came down – his decision to discuss abortion via women who have actually gone through it is a welcome relief from all the men talking about how they know thetruth about the experience.
(via Mark Ruffalo Sends an Awesome Pro-Choice Message in Mississippi)

According to Stop Patriarchy, Mark Ruffalo sent a speech to be read at an abortion rights rally this weekend in Mississippi in which he expressed his frustration with the state legislature’s ongoing attempts to close every last women’s health centers that offer abortion services.

The Clarion-Ledger reports that over 100 supporters gathered at the Jackson Women’s Health Organization, and listened to a personal account of Ruffalo’s about the issue of abortion rights, in which he mentioned his mother’s struggle to obtain an abortion when she was young:

I am a man. I could say this has nothing to do with me. Except I have two daughters and I have a mother who was forced to illegally have an abortion in her state where abortion was illegal when she was a very young woman. It cost $600 cash. It was a traumatizing thing for her. It was shameful and sleazy and demeaning. When I heard the story I was aghast by the lowliness of a society that would make a woman do that. I could not understand its lack of humanity; today is no different.

Ruffalo reportedly referenced the United States as it existed pre-Roe v. Wade as “relic of an America that was not free nor equal nor very kind”, saying that it “we have worked long and hard to leave behind” that time:

My own mother fought to make herself more than a possession; she lived her life as a mother who chose when she would have children, and a wife who could earn a living if she so chose. I want my daughters to enjoy that same choice. I don’t want to turn back the hands of time to when women shuttled across state lines in the thick of night to resolve an unwanted pregnancy, in a cheap hotel room just south of the state line. Where a transaction of $600 cash becomes the worth of a young woman’s life. So that is why I am lending my voice to you and your movement today. Because I actually trust the women I know. I trust them with their choices, I trust them with their bodies and I trust them with their children.

Ruffalo has been politically active before; he’s a vocal opponent of fracking. And while his characterization of the impact of Roe v. Wade as a “law of the land for decades” is slightly historically inaccurate – anti-choice supporters have been chipping away at Roe v. Wade since that Supreme Court ruling came down – his decision to discuss abortion via women who have actually gone through it is a welcome relief from all the men talking about how they know thetruth about the experience.

(via Mark Ruffalo Sends an Awesome Pro-Choice Message in Mississippi)

thenewwomensmovement
bebinn:

becauseiamawoman:

(via Plan B One-Step™ Consumer: Save $10)
Dear follows, I post this every couple of months so if you need Plan B, you can get it. Here is a $10 off coupon. Remember that at Planned Parenthood (in MA at least), its only $26 to start with!
Reblog to let your followers get it too!

If your regular birth control fails (or you didn’t use it, for whatever reason), emergency contraception is here to save the day!

bebinn:

becauseiamawoman:

(via Plan B One-Step™ Consumer: Save $10)

Dear follows, I post this every couple of months so if you need Plan B, you can get it. Here is a $10 off coupon. Remember that at Planned Parenthood (in MA at least), its only $26 to start with!

Reblog to let your followers get it too!

If your regular birth control fails (or you didn’t use it, for whatever reason), emergency contraception is here to save the day!

womenwhokickass

micdotcom:

After 238 years, the U.S. Navy finally has a female four-star admiral

Adm. Michelle J. Howard was awarded the Navy’s current highest rank Tuesday at the Women in Military Service for America Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. She takes over as the vice chief of operations, the Navy’s second-highest officer position.

Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said at the ceremony that the momentous event is a “representation of how far we have come, and how far she has helped bring us.”

Read more | Follow micdotcom 

dynastylnoire

thepoliticalfreakshow:

Today’s Supreme Court decision against Obamacare’s birth control mandate comes in at at a hefty 49 pages (95 if you count the three dissenting opinions). If you’re looking for a more pocket-sized version of the ruling, here’s the decision summarized in three…

afro-dominicano
medresearch:


It May Take Guts to Cure Diabetes
By switching off a single gene, scientists at Columbia University’s Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center have converted human gastrointestinal cells into insulin-producing cells, demonstrating in principle that a drug could retrain cells inside a person’s GI tract to produce insulin.
The research was reported today in the online issue of the journal Nature Communications.

“People have been talking about turning one cell into another for a long time, but until now we hadn’t gotten to the point of creating a fully functional insulin-producing cell by the manipulation of a single target,” said the study’s senior author, Domenico Accili, MD, the Russell Berrie Foundation Professor of Diabetes (in Medicine) at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).

The research was supported by the NIH (grants DK58282 and DK63608); the Manpei Suzuki Diabetes Foundation, the Swedish Society for Medical Research, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, AstraZeneca Corporation, the JPB Foundation, and the Brehm Coalition.
Image: Human gastrointestinal cells from patients were engineered to express insulin (fluorescent green) in the lab. (Image by Columbia University Medical Center.)

medresearch:

It May Take Guts to Cure Diabetes

By switching off a single gene, scientists at Columbia University’s Naomi Berrie Diabetes Center have converted human gastrointestinal cells into insulin-producing cells, demonstrating in principle that a drug could retrain cells inside a person’s GI tract to produce insulin.

The research was reported today in the online issue of the journal Nature Communications.

“People have been talking about turning one cell into another for a long time, but until now we hadn’t gotten to the point of creating a fully functional insulin-producing cell by the manipulation of a single target,” said the study’s senior author, Domenico Accili, MD, the Russell Berrie Foundation Professor of Diabetes (in Medicine) at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC).

The research was supported by the NIH (grants DK58282 and DK63608); the Manpei Suzuki Diabetes Foundation, the Swedish Society for Medical Research, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, AstraZeneca Corporation, the JPB Foundation, and the Brehm Coalition.

Image: Human gastrointestinal cells from patients were engineered to express insulin (fluorescent green) in the lab. (Image by Columbia University Medical Center.)

sans-nuage
doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Ton Koene
Jean-Didier Longa-Ikona, Nurse, refugee from the Democratic Republic of Congo
"I was born in Kinshasa but when the war came I decided to cross over to CAR. I am alone here. When the conflict broke out around Bossangoa there were no humanitarian organizations. We would only see military vehicles. We would show people our MSF clothes so they would be convinced in what we did. We would tell them we were there to assist in their grief, and in the clinic neither guns nor knives are allowed. We would say their family could get treatment safely here just in case the situation became serious. Some people used to accept but others refused to believe us, saying that if they came to us, they would get shot."

doctorswithoutborders:

Photo by Ton Koene

Jean-Didier Longa-Ikona, Nurse, refugee from the Democratic Republic of Congo

"I was born in Kinshasa but when the war came I decided to cross over to CAR. I am alone here. When the conflict broke out around Bossangoa there were no humanitarian organizations. We would only see military vehicles. We would show people our MSF clothes so they would be convinced in what we did. We would tell them we were there to assist in their grief, and in the clinic neither guns nor knives are allowed. We would say their family could get treatment safely here just in case the situation became serious. Some people used to accept but others refused to believe us, saying that if they came to us, they would get shot."